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Optimizing your sleep

Reading about sports sleep coach Nick Littlehales, and how he optimizes sleep for elite athletes.
This man has COUNTLESS articles on optimizing your sleep for peak performance. 

Part of learning to optimize your singing involves optimizing your health and your body.  I have ALWAYS been a good sleeper-- excepting those times in which I had to subvert my naturally fantastic sleep habits to keep other humans alive.  If you struggle with sleep-- check out his blog linked above.  Some habits of successful sleepers:

1. Keep your bedroom free from clutter and from work.  This can be hard to do if you have space limitations, (for instance if you're in a dorm).  But you can find ways to keep things compartmentalized.  Put your laptop in a drawer so that it's not looking at you with that guilt-inducing look. 

2. Stop looking at screens! Experts suggest that you stop looking at "blue screens" two hours before sleep.

3. Develop a routine. This can be a simple way to cue your body that it's time to sleep.  It can be as simple as brushing and flossing and washing your face, but could also include things like spraying your pillow with a dilution of lavender oil, or doing a simple bedtime yoga routine. You know I've got to shout out to my Austin yogi Adriene here.... if we have ever met I have endorsed her youtube yoga routines.  Don't be afraid just go try it.

4. Try a weighted blanket?  Sometimes I wish I needed to try this.  It just seems like it would be so cozy if you were a fidgety sleeper.  Has anyone ever tried these? Are they amazing?  I listen to Young House Love Has a Podcast and Sherry highly endorses them.  I love, I trust.

If you have tips and tricks that have been successful for you- share them!  I see many of you struggling with this during the school year and I want to spray you with lavender and make you take naps. I know that time is so precious and that every single course and every teacher has a list of demands a mile long, but you can't function as an elite level athlete-- or even just as a regular college student--- or, let's be honest, as a human in general-- if you don't take care of yourself. 

WorkSleepSingSleepWork,
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